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Two doses of Oxford University Covid-19 vaccine produces stronger immune response than one – Daily Mail

In trials on pigs researchers found the vaccine being developed by scientists at Oxford appears to work better in a two-part ‘prime’ and ‘boost’ dosage – the same way the MMR jab is given.

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Squirrel tests positive for the bubonic plague in Colorado – ABC News

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Public health officials have announced that a squirrel in Colorado has tested positive for the bubonic plague.
The town of Morrison, Colorado, in Jefferson County, which is just west of Denver, made the startling announcement saying that the squirrel is the first case of plague in the county.
Plague is an infectious disease caused by the bacteria Yersinia pestis, and can be contracted by humans and household animals if proper precautions are not taken, officials from Jefferson County Public Health (JCPH) said in a statement released to the public.
It is possible for humans to be infected with the bubonic plague through bites from infected fleas and by direct contact with blood or tissues of infected animals such as a cough or a bite.
Jefferson County Public Health said that cats are highly susceptible to the plague from things like flea bites, a rodent scratch or bite, and ingesting an infected rodent. Cats can die if not treated quickly with antibiotics after contact with the plague.
Officials also said that dogs are not as susceptible to the plague as cats are but still may pick up and carry plague-infected rodent fleas. Any pet owner who suspects that their pet is ill should contact a veterinarian immediately.
Symptoms of plague may include sudden onset of high fever, chills, headache, nausea and extreme pain and swelling of lymph nodes, occurring within two to seven days after exposure. Plague can be effectively treated with antibiotics when diagnosed early. Anyone experiencing these symptoms should consult a physician, said JCPH.
Risk for contracting the bubonic plague is extremely low as long as the proper precautions are taken and JCPH published a list of them including eliminating all sources of food, shelter and access for wild animals around the home, not feeding wild animals, maintaining a litter and trash-free yard to reduce wild animal habitats, having people and pets should avoid all contact with sick or dead wild animals and rodents, using precaution when handling sick pets and having them examined by a veterinarian, consulting with a veterinarian about flea and tick control for pets and keeping pets from roaming freely outside the home where they may prey on wild animals and bring the disease home with them.
All pet owners who live close to wild animal populations, such as prairie dog colonies or other known wildlife habitats, should consult their veterinarian about flea control for their pets to help prevent the transfer of fleas to humans, JCPH said.
According to the CDC, even though there is no vaccine for the plague, it can be treated successfully with antibiotics if caught within 24 hours of exhibiting symptoms.
Arguably the most infamous plague outbreak was the so-called Black Death, a multi-century pandemic that swept through Asia and Europe, according to National Geographic. It was believed to start in China in 1334, spreading along trade routes and reaching Europe via Sicilian ports in the late 1340s. The plague killed an estimated 25 million people, almost a third of the continents population. The Black Death lingered on for centuries, particularly in cities. Outbreaks included the Great Plague of London (1665-66), in which 70,000 residents died.
However, the CDC says that there is now only an average of seven human plague cases per year and the WHO says the mortality rate is estimated to be between 8-10%.
National Geographic is owned by Walt Disney, the parent company of ABC News.

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Hawaii State Department of Health traces 44 COVID-19 cases to a single person – KITV Honolulu

The Hawai’i State Department of Health has traced 44 cases of COVID-19 here to a single person.

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“I don’t think anyone would purposefully expose anyone else to COVID-19, often individuals are asymptomatic and don’t know that they’re infected. This is a classic situation in which I think emphasizes treating everyone around you as though they were infected,” Dr. Bruce Anderson, Director of the Department of Health, said.

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Coronavirus updates: Doctor compares Miami to Wuhan as epicenter of COVID-19 pandemic – ABC News

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The novel coronavirus pandemic has now killed more than 570,000 people worldwide.
Over 13 million people across the globe have been diagnosed with COVID-19, the disease caused by the new respiratory virus, according to data compiled by the Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins University. The actual numbers are believed to be much higher due to testing shortages, many unreported cases and suspicions that some governments are hiding or downplaying the scope of their nations’ outbreaks.
The United States has become the worst-affected country, with more than 3.3 million diagnosed cases and at least 135,582 deaths.
A health care worker signs people up for testing at a COVID-19 testing site at the Miami Beach Convention Center, during the coronavirus pandemic, Monday, July 13, 2020, in Miami Beach, Fla.
A health care worker signs people up for testing at a COVID-19 testing site at the Miami Beach Convention Center, during the coronavirus pandemic, Monday, July 13, 2020, in Miami Beach, Fla. Lynne Sladky/AP
Latest headlines:

  • COVID-19 cases top 13 million worldwide
  • Russia lifts two-week quarantine for arriving foreigners from tomorrow
  • U of Miami infectious disease doctor: Miami is now the epicenter for the virus”
  • Hawaii delays reopening to tourists until September 1
  • Here is how the news is developing today. All times Eastern. Check back for updates.
    4:22 a.m.: Russia lifts two-week quarantine for arriving foreigners from tomorrow
    A 14-day quarantine will no longer be required for anyone arriving to Russia, according to a decree signed by the country’s chief sanitary doctor on Monday.
    Starting from Wednesday, people entering Russia will need to provide a document — in English or Russian — that they have tested negative for the coronavirus in the past 72 hours.
    Alternatively, they can test in Russia and provide the document within three days. This news followed last week’s announcement that Russia is looking resume international air travel in mid July.
    Russia confirmed 6,248 new coronavirus infections on Tuesday bringing the countrys official number of cases to 739 947.
    Over the past 24 hours, 175 people have died bringing the total toll to 11,614.
    A total of 8,804 people recovered over the last 24 hours bringing the overall number of recoveries to 512,825.
    3:17 a.m.: U of Miami infectious disease doctor: Miami is now the epicenter for the virus”
    A group of Miami-area medical experts joined Miami-Dade County Mayor Carlos Gimenez on a Zoom news conference Monday morning and made clear that South Florida is in a dire position when it comes to the spread of COVID-19.
    Miami is now the epicenter for the virus, said Lilian M. Abbo, M.D., an infectious diseases specialist at the University of Miami Health System and the Chief of Infection Prevention for Jackson Health System. What we were seeing in Wuhan

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